16 thoughts on “Growth vs Fixed Mindset For Elementary Students

  1. This graphic is going to generate some amazing conversations and revelations in elementary school classrooms. We really need to be more explicit with children about all these ideas and you’ve given us a great resource to do it. Thank you Reid!

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    • Agreed! We need to have these conversations with students….and with parents.

      Parent: “Well I wasn’t good at math so it doesn’t surprise me she isn’t either.”

      That’s putting a fixed mindset on your child….and something else we need to overcome.

      We need to focus on this in schools help students understand the difference and start using this vocabulary when we talk with them about their own learning.

      A mini-lesson I’ll add to my new substituting role. :)

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      • Cool Jeff! @jutecht Are you doing some substitute teaching?! The kids are in for a treat ;) Wish you were my substitute teacher when I was a student…

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        • I’m putting in my application we’ll see if they let me be a substitute. You know because I need something less to do. :)

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  2. Great infographic Reid! I wonder whether this infographic is apt beyond the student? Personally I think it could be used to highlight a lot of the issues we teachers have when it comes to changing our own mind set and ideas. The one line that really got me thinking was ‘If you succeed, I feel threatened!” It really frustrates me that many educators still demonstrate/display this type of mind set. Success should be shared and applauded not mocked and ridiculed. That is why I love your infographic so much. It highlights so much of what is right and wrong with learning attitudes at the student level and beyond.

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  3. Thanks Reid. We have been using this model with the Year 7s lately and I’ve just added your infographic to a bank of resources we are sharing with them during their December project week.

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  4. I came across Carol Dweck’s TEDtalk about Growth vs Fixed Mindset. Very interesting science behind what is happening in the brain between the two! link to ted.com

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  5. Reid, I love the infographics you create and I’m going to show this one to our Team Lead to see if we can work it into our 6th Grade Advisory program. Heck, I’m going to show it my High School daughter who is struggling with some subjects.

    Thanks

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  6. Dear Reid,

    I am the editor of a local free parenting magazine for young families. We have an article on Resilience in our next issue and would love to use your Growth Mindset infographic. Let me know if this is possible.

    Thank you
    Pascale

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  7. Pingback: Designing Learning Experiences | always learning

  8. Reid,

    I plan on sharing this image on my blog, with a link and full credit to you. Hope that is okay.

    Larry Ferlazzo

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  9. Providing our students a place and time to work on this could really be a turning point for many of them (and us too!). Thank you for sharing, Reid!

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  10. Reid, is the text from the infographic yours too? Was thinking of quoting it and would like to reference it properly.

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    • Hi Diana:

      Sorry for the late response. I haven’t been on this blog in a long time. I know that I looked over a few other initial growth mindset graphics and videos before making this, so I would assume that over half of the language was borrowed and/or modified. I think I may have had some “original” thoughts, but even that’s relative and probably subconsciously picked up from other texts I was exposed to.

      In the end, I created the graphic. But the majority of the language was not mine or amalgamated from a variety of sources.

      Good luck,
      Reid

      Reply

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