Copyright or Copywrong

License Some rights reserved by tvol

The more I read about copyright, citation, attribution, and the struggle to what is legally correct and an acceptable loophole, the more I find myself in a fog.  There seems to be great latitude under the “fair use” phrase especially when using material for an educational purpose.  I take great solace in Doug Johnson’s compilation of copyright posts.  He seems to be guided by a common sense theme, often missing from other discussions.  The idea that as long as it is non-commercial, for an educational use, and attribution given one is most likely safe appeals to me.  I have never heard of any school or child being given a take down order or taken to court.

Perhaps by encouraging students and teachers to license their images and other materials via Creative Commons each group will have a better feel for the ownership issue.  Putting the shoe on the other foot so to speak.

Speaking of Creative Commons, the people at Common Craft have really got a knack of explaining things in a simple, concise way.  Their video “Creative Commons Explained” is a perfect example of this.  Years ago, I remember seeing one on wikis.  I am going to look it up.  Makes me wish I could draw.

Now for a confession.  I did not read much of the Curator’s Code.  I got to this paragraph,

“While we have systems in place for literary citation, image attribution, and scientific reference, we don’t yet have a system that codifies the attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy, a system that treats discovery as the creative labor that it is.”

and felt my eyes glaze over and my mind drift away to what I might have for dessert later.  I sent the quote to friends teaching in Scotland.  They have dubbed this an example of “Jargon as Another Language”.  It was suggested we had been JALfered.  I do understand the need for uniformity.  I am after all a librarian who owns a copy of Sears Library Headings and a copy of Dewey Decimal Classification.  I just want the argument to be in plain English.

 

Footprints

Could we please have some uplifting, positive readings now?  I have read all the readings for week 2 of course 2:  “RateMyTeacher.com”, “Don’t Overestimate Privacy of Online Information”, “Beware: the Internet Could Own Your Future”, and “Digital Profile Bookmarks”.    I have checked to make sure I have the most locked down privacy on Facebook.  Considering dropping it altogether. While I won’t be vying for college admission (except for SUNY on-line courses), I don’t want my general life spread across continents.  (Mind you, I doubt that deadly dull will be something people are looking for.)

Checked my name and that of several friends and schools that I have worked at on the RateMyTeacher.com site.  Can’t decide if it is good or bad that we aren’t there.  Seems as if most of the posts are written by students.  Several appear to be written by students that probably did not get a good grade.  Resembles the ISR site for reviewing administrators and schools.  I like the idea, but it seems to be more of a place to whine and complain without little balanced reporting.

After reading these articles it is clear to me that we must make sure that positive things about ourselves and our students appear online.  Displaying good work, discussions about community projects, and recommendations that include constructive comments are desperately needed to off-set the ease of negative information.  I am also going to be more aware of strangers being in my travel photos.  Don’t want to add to their footprint.

 

 

Interpreting what is said.

Danah Boyd, in her blog article, “Bullying” Has Little Resonance with Teenagers, has stirred up lively discussions.  While she is addressing teenagers in her piece, much of what she says speaks to us that work with the younger students.  As I have mentioned previously, I am dealing with some cyberbulling issues at my school, with fourth graders.  The Common Sense website has been very helpful.  However, Danah’s statement in the article, “we need to start by understanding the underlying dynamics”, has caused me to stop and rethink my approach.  What do I know about the family life of the “suspects” and the “victims”?  What are the external influences upon these students?  Am I using terms, such as bullying, when they really don’t relate to it at all.

As a victim of bullying during my middle and high school years, I am not so sure I would have been willing to try to see what was driving my tormentors.  If memory serves me, and keep in mind my memory is not 100% accurate any longer, my main feeling was the overwhelming hope that someday I could get revenge.  Thankfully, and great number of years later I no longer feel that need.  I still don’t really want to know what was driving my tormentors but I have let go of them (mostly).

Conversations with children of all ages is vital.  We must listen to what they are saying, watch their interactions with others, and be there to lend  a shoulder or hand when they need it.