Tag Archive: substitution

Jun 09

Course 4 week 2-How Deep is the Integration?

 

The SAMR model

The SAMR model, developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, has been a useful lens for looking at tech integration.  In my language learning classroom, have I been merely substituting electronic flash cards for the hard tag version?

One example (for this post)

I still give out vocabulary flash cards printed on hard tag.  We do different activities and games with those sets of flash cards.  With the use of Quizlet, students have been offered another choice of study and another layer reinforcement for the learning.  Quizlet has allowed me to augment the learning experience for kids with the ability to add pictures and use games as a way to enhance the practice ritual.  In addition, for upper grade levels, I have had students create their own flash cards after evaluating their own strengths and weaknesses.

TPACK diagram

Once again, we have an additional acronym to add to our educational vocabulary.  Below is another example of the TPACK diagram.  This is the result of a group work exercise at one of our COETAIL classes.

From diagrams to reality

So what does successful tech integration look like?  Watch the video below.

A Commitment to High Tech Education

It is surprising that this article was originally published in 2003.  (The video was later added to Youtube in 2010.)  It was impressive to see the integration of technology at this high school redefining what students were doing.  The tasks were relevant and meaningful for the students.  With clear purposes for the use of technology (in this video), students were motivated and challenged to interpret and produce results for use in the community.

Reflective questions

In Jeff Utech’s blog post, Evaluating Technology Use in the Classroom, Jeff presents four questions that could be used when observing a classroom activity, or watching a video such as the one from Edutopia.

  1. Is the technology being used “Just because it’s there”?
  2. Is the technology allowing the teacher/students to do Old things in Old ways?
  3. Is the technology allowing the teacher/students to do Old things in New ways?
  4. Is the technology creating new and different learning experiences for the students?
I like the way that Jeff has organized the questions starting with superficial use and gradually “peeling away at the onion”, digging deeper and deeper.  These are questions that I ask myself.  These are questions that I have had  my colleagues ask me.
Tech integration needs to start with the outer layers of the onion.  It is natural for us to explore and play with something that is new (just because it is there).  However, if I only tasted the outer skin of the onion, I do not know if I would continue to cook with onions.  The challenge is to continue to peel away at the onion in order to have a taste of the meaty, juicy part.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.coetail.com/dimanishi/2012/06/09/course-4/

Nov 04

New Tools, New Ways of Learning

I believe that in some cases, I was guilty of doing the same thing, just in new ways.  Instead of using a tape recorder, I was using a digital audio recorder on the computer.  Instead of using the overhead projector, I was using the document camera. However, the document camera does allow me to recognize exemplary student work.  It also is good for using real student work to discover and correct common mistakes.

Taking students to a new level of learning is a concept that is now much more in forefront of my thinking now

With the use of iPads to help practice writing in hiragana, katakana, and kanji, it is now more apparent that the programs used are geared towards lower level thinking skills.  Therefore, it is important to further investigate how other apps (iMovie, Popplet, ReplayNote, etc.) can be be utilized for students to and apply their language skills.

On the team level, my colleagues and I are now using Google Documents to take collaboration to a new level.  Working on the same document at the same time saves time, gets everyone involved, and allows everyone an equal voice.   This is new learning for our group and it has worked well in the case of taking meeting notes and getting member feedback.  Team members can give timely feedback that is shared back to the entire group almost immediately after a meeting.  It is open and honest communication and collaboration.  There is not the need for one person to collect, sort, and then combine it into a single document to be later circulated to the group.  Collaboration is made easier and the process is accelerated with Google Documents.

 

 

Reference:

 

http://edorigami.edublogs.org/category/assessment/page/4/

Permanent link to this article: http://www.coetail.com/dimanishi/2011/11/04/new-tools-new-ways-of-learning/