Tag Archive: storytelling

Apr 01

Japanese News Report-Course 3 wrap-up

It was a pleasure and an enriching experience working together with my colleagues (Reiko Aya, Hiromi Hosoi, and Machiko Romaine) to create this Japanese food news report lesson plan.

Our two major goals for the lessons are…

  1. Students will deepen their understanding on food and nutrition.
  2. Students will become aware and be able to express the differences and similarities on meals such as school lunches between cultures.

Using a wiki and Googledocs to write, edit, and publish our lesson plan and grading rubric helped to facilitate collaboration.  Our lesson focused on higher level language learners–Students who could use more sophisticated language in order make comparisons and describe the different situations.

Fine tuning the language of the grading rubric was a good process.  Rubrics help guide the students when involved in a project.  The parts of this rubric can also be used for future projects.

Reiko also had a few additional photos on Flickr.
Actually going through the story boarding process for this project, I think our group learned how specific roles might be assigned to group members in order to help keep the group moving forward.

Reflecting on our project example, I think it works well since it is the simplest way (technically) for students to create the project.

Thank you Reiko Aya, Hiromi Hosoi, and Machiko Romaine for all of your collaborative efforts to complete this project.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.coetail.com/dimanishi/2012/04/01/japanese-news-report-course-3-wrap-up/

Mar 31

From Pre-Analog to Digital Storytelling

Vision-

David Jakes wrote, “There is a biological basis for visual communication.” in his blog post from 2008.

There are…

  • auditory nerve connections to the brain = 30,000 fibers
  • optical nerve connections to the brain = 1,000,000 fibers (Burmark, 2002)

The optical fibers in the human body are more than 3x the amount of the auditory fibers.  This makes sense as to why vision plays an important role in our lives.

Long ago-

My digital storytelling roots start when I was a kid.  My father had an 8mm camera and then later a Super 8 camera.   I have found memories of getting out the screen and projector in order to watch the silent black and white movies.  I was later impressed when color and audio were also included!

Sound Super Zoom - Super 8 Camera

I also have to admit that I grew up experiencing 35 mm slides shows.  Yes, the kind with two slide projectors so images could fade into the other.  There used a time when I wanted to possess my own two slide projectors so I could make the same type of presentations.

Kodachrome Slideshow

Now with all of the technological advances available today, it easy to create multi-media presentations. Digital storytelling is no longer limited to only those possessing special equipment, but it can now easily be done on your home computer, iPad, cellular phone, etc.  The tools needed to create digital media are readily available and additional content is available through a variety of resources on the Internet.

Great example-

4 Generations: The Waterbuffalo Movie (HD) – I first learned about The Waterbuffalo Movie when reading  David Jakes’ post.  The story and visuals combined with Robert Thompson’s narration and background music create a compelling message.

 

Student work-

One activity that I do with students towards the beginning of the year is to create a simple puppet show to have students perform their self-introduction. (first graders, beginning level)

This year I was able to try out an iPad 2 for a short time.  I was able to create, edit,  and share a simple story acting out the classroom phrases.  Students enjoyed the  activity and they liked the final product.  Using iMovie on the iPad2 made editing quick and it was easy to incorporate background music to help create a more finished product.

With the fifth grade students having access to either an iPad 2 or a Macbook, a future project could be having the students create their own story about someone famous in Japan.  Students would do the research and gather useful video clips, photographs, maps, and other media.  They would be required to learn about the person’s life and perform a self-introduction as the person.  They could use puppets similar to the ones used in the self-introduction video or it could be something similar to the Common Craft style.  One goal would be to try and show how the person the student selected is/was important to Japan.

Today-

Like many other adults, it is amazing to watch my own kids easily taking movies with the iPhone, iPad, or DS.  Out of the blue, my six year old just finished his video of the inside of our house.  My dad started with a super 8 camera.  My son started with an iPhone.  I look forward to seeing what the next generation will have to play with.

References-

Burmark, Lynell. Visual Literacy: Learn to See. See to Learn. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2002.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.coetail.com/dimanishi/2012/03/31/digital-storytelling/