Steve Jobs and ISTE’s NETS

It was my first adventure to start from learning what NETS is and What ISTE stands for. According to Wikipedia, National Educational Technology Standards(NETS) were set by International Society for Technology in Education(ISTE). The purpose is ‘to leverage the use of technology in K-12 education to enable students to learn effectively and live productively in an increasingly digital society’. It was funded by NASA in consultation with the U.S. Department of Education, the Millken Exchange on Education Technology and Apple Computer. The first set of standards, NETS for Students, was released in June 1998. Please let me highlight that ISTE was consulted with Apple Computer here. Steve Jobs as the founder of Apple company passed away a few days ago. On the 6th of October, I was told by one of parents at my school(, where I work), and I confessed that I could not recognize his name soon after I heard his name from her although it did not take much time for me to realize that he was the Apple co-founder. On TV, Mr.Son Masayoshi as the Softbank CEO said that ‘he was just like  Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni’. When his name was sparked by his voice, I realized that he was such a revolutionary man to have contributed his life to this unprecedented IT society. What amazed me was his life itself. This all can be referred to his speech addressed at the commencement ceremony of Stanford University in 2005. He believed what he had believed in himself no matter what other people said. Needless to say his life was so unique. He did not follow his life as almost other people did. The cite below I came across reading the article from Edutopia.

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

This also reminded me of what our wonderful YIS COETAIL instructor Kim had advised regarding the tips for blog-posts. ‘Take your time, write from the heart, write what’s comfortable and keep trying.’  This approach will show me how to reflect on my work honestly too, and give me a chance to have a meditation. As I also saw what Mr Jobs was interested in on TV, he was in touch with ZEN, where he could get unprecedented idea.

 His speech could highlight what NETS are meant to be, and all the reasons behind the foundation of ISTE. As you know NETS are as follows

1.Creativity and Innovation

2.Communication and Collaboration Research and Information Fluency

3.Research and Information Fluency

4.Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

5.Digital Citizenship

6.Technology Operations and Concepts

Is ‘Creativity and Innovation’ put intentionally at the first line or top of 6 fundamental principles? It seems to me that this is the driving force of all other standards, and at the heart of Mr Steve Job, who might not even have intended to become a creator or an innovator. I think educating students followed by those dogmas are not as easy as we think, yet at the same time not as inapplicable to everyday life as we think because just like Steve Job himself dropped out of his college school, there are also students who just do not want to come to school to learn any subjects, which they were not interested in anyway for whatever reasons were behind and rather love to stay where they find convenient to learn. This is really what we call customized life. He did not to have to get on the right track, which other people followed.  However Steve was old or matured or determined enough to make his grounded decision by himself since he had known or understood himself more than anybody could tell who/what he is. To do something unprecedented thing takes a certain amount of risk, time and courage since majority of people have never done. After his death, NETS do not seem to be only standards themselves but also something that goes to his solid sense of self-esteem.

3 thoughts on “Steve Jobs and ISTE’s NETS

  1. Chie – I loved this posting. I agree entirely that Steve Jobs would have considered NETS to be the very bare minimum requirement for students today.

    I also really enjoyed Jobs’ speech to Stanford. I came across it a few years ago, perhaps soon after it was actually delivered. I loved the message that he was trying to encourage people to take a risk, as that’s the only way you can really succeed. I find myself thinking about that a lot as we go along this course – getting outside the comfort zone and taking risks is never easy, especially when you have a room full of children in front of you, but it’s the only way we’re ever going to get better and more successful.

    Thanks for the post.

    • Thank you for your thoughtful comment! Thanks to this COETAIL course, I finally managed to get the precious opportunity to be moved by Steve Jobs and his speech. Otherwise I would have missed something really important thing just like his awesome address. For me, IT(information technology ) entities can be really insensitive tools if you do not use them or are unfamiliar with them. For instance, you will end up missing or losing so many things if you are far from being a digitally minded person or at least you are not hoping to be like that. Although this might be something ‘needless to say’ thing especially for high-tech people or digital native people, the information nowadays is always on line, streaming, and something, which you have to find, select and get on your own. This convenient learning environment challenges my life-long learning attitude!

  2. Love your connections to current events! I know the NETS standards have changed a lot since I’m sure Steve Jobs first had a look at them, but now they probably reflect his vision and passion even more than before.

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